Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repositorio.udes.edu.co/handle/001/3247
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dc.contributor.authorPeiris, Davidspa
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Simon R.spa
dc.contributor.authorBeratarrechea, Andreaspa
dc.contributor.authorCárdenas, María Kathiaspa
dc.contributor.authorDiez Canseco, Franciscospa
dc.contributor.authorGoudge, Janespa
dc.contributor.authorGyamfi, Joycespa
dc.contributor.authorKamano, Jemima Hoinespa
dc.contributor.authorIrazola, Vilmaspa
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Clairespa
dc.contributor.authorKengne, Andre P.spa
dc.contributor.authorKeat, Ng Kienspa
dc.contributor.authorMiranda, J. Jaimespa
dc.contributor.authorMohan, Saileshspa
dc.contributor.authorMukasa, Barbaraspa
dc.contributor.authorNg, Eleanorspa
dc.contributor.authorNieuwlaat, Robbyspa
dc.contributor.authorOgedegbe, Olugbengaspa
dc.contributor.authorOvbiagele, Brucespa
dc.contributor.authorPlange Rhule, Jacobspa
dc.contributor.authorPraveen, Devarsettyspa
dc.contributor.authorSalam, Abdulspa
dc.contributor.authorThorogood, Margaretspa
dc.contributor.authorThrift, Amanda G.spa
dc.contributor.authorVedanthan, Rajeshspa
dc.contributor.authorWaddy, Salina P.spa
dc.contributor.authorWebster, Jacquispa
dc.contributor.authorWebster, Ruthspa
dc.contributor.authorYeates, Karenspa
dc.contributor.authorYusoff, Khalidspa
dc.contributor.authorLópez Jaramillo, Patriciospa
dc.contributor.authorHypertension Research Programme memberseng
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-02T16:44:55Zspa
dc.date.available2019-07-02T16:44:55Zspa
dc.date.issued2015-11-09spa
dc.identifier.issn1748-5908spa
dc.identifier.urihttp://repositorio.udes.edu.co/handle/001/3247spa
dc.description15 p.spa
dc.description.abstractBackground The Global Alliance for Chronic Diseases comprises the majority of the world’s public research funding agencies. It is focussed on implementation research to tackle the burden of chronic diseases in low- and middle-income countries and amongst vulnerable populations in high-income countries. In its inaugural research call, 15 projects were funded, focussing on lowering blood pressure-related disease burden. In this study, we describe a reflexive mapping exercise to identify the behaviour change strategies undertaken in each of these projects. Methods Using the Behaviour Change Wheel framework, each team rated the capability, opportunity and motivation of the various actors who were integral to each project (e.g. community members, non-physician health workers and doctors in projects focussed on service delivery). Teams then mapped the interventions they were implementing and determined the principal policy categories in which those interventions were operating. Guidance was provided on the use of Behaviour Change Wheel to support consistency in responses across teams. Ratings were iteratively discussed and refined at several group meetings. Results There was marked variation in the perceived capabilities, opportunities and motivation of the various actors who were being targeted for behaviour change strategies. Despite this variation, there was a high degree of synergy in interventions functions with most teams utilising complex interventions involving education, training, enablement, environmental restructuring and persuasion oriented strategies. Similar policy categories were also targeted across teams particularly in the areas of guidelines, communication/marketing and service provision with few teams focussing on fiscal measures, regulation and legislation. Conclusions The large variation in preparedness to change behaviour amongst the principal actors across these projects suggests that the interventions themselves will be variably taken up, despite the similarity in approaches taken. The findings highlight the importance of contextual factors in driving success and failure of research programmes. Forthcoming outcome and process evaluations from each project will build on this exploratory work and provide a greater understanding of factors that might influence scale-up of intervention strategies.eng
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfspa
dc.language.isoengspa
dc.relation.ispartofImplementation Scienceeng
dc.rightsDerechos Reservados - Implementation Science, 2015spa
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/spa
dc.sourcehttps://implementationscience.biomedcentral.com/track/pdf/10.1186/s13012-015-0331-0eng
dc.titleBehaviour change strategies for reducing blood pressure-related disease burden : Findings from a global implementation research programmeeng
dc.typeArtículo de revistaspa
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13012-015-0331-0spa
dc.rights.accessrightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessspa
dc.rights.creativecommonsAtribución-NoComercial 4.0 Internacional (CC BY-NC 4.0)spa
dc.subject.proposalImplementation scienceeng
dc.subject.proposalHypertensioneng
dc.subject.proposalBehaviour change theoryeng
dc.subject.proposalCollaborative researcheng
dc.subject.proposalLow - and middle-income countrieseng
dc.type.coarhttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_6501spa
dc.type.driverinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlespa
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionspa
dc.type.contentTextspa
dc.type.redcolhttp://purl.org/redcol/resource_type/ARTspa
oaire.accessrightshttp://purl.org/coar/access_right/c_abf2spa
oaire.versionhttp://purl.org/coar/version/c_970fb48d4fbd8a85spa
Appears in Collections:DCABA. Artículos de Investigación



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