Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repositorio.udes.edu.co/handle/001/3544
Title: Urinary sodium and potassium excretion, mortality, and cardiovascular events
Authors: O’Donnell, Martin J.
Mente, Andrew
Rangarajan, Sumathy
McQueen, Matthew J.
Wang, Xingyu
Liu, Lisheng
Yan, Hou
Lee, Shun Fu
Mony, Prem
Devanath, Anitha
Rosengren, Annika
López Jaramillo, Patricio
Diaz, Rafael
Avezum, Alvaro
Lanas, Fernando
Yusoff, Khalid
Iqbal, Romaina
Ilow, Rafal
Mohammadifard, Noushin
Gulec, Sadi
Yusufali, Afzalhussein
Kruger, Lanthe
Yusuf, Rita
Chifamba, Jephat
Kabali, Conrad
Dagenais, Gilles
Lear, Scott A.
Teo, Koon
Yusuf, Salim
The PURE (Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology) Study investigators
Keywords: Urinary sodium
Potassium excretion
Mortality
Cardiovascular events
Issue Date: 14-Aug-2014
Abstract: BACKGROUND The optimal range of sodium intake for cardiovascular health is controversial. METHODS We obtained morning fasting urine samples from 101,945 persons in 17 countries and estimated 24-hour sodium and potassium excretion (used as a surrogate for intake). We examined the association between estimated urinary sodium and potassium excretion and the composite outcome of death and major cardiovascular events. RESULTS The mean estimated sodium and potassium excretion were 4.93 g per day and 2.12 g per day, respectively. With a mean follow-up of 3.7 years, the composite outcome occurred in 3317 participants (3.3%). As compared with an estimated sodium excretion of 4.00 to 5.99 g per day (reference range), a higher estimated sodium excretion (≥7.00 g per day) was associated with an increased risk of the composite outcome (odds ratio, 1.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02 to 1.30), as well as increased risks of death and major cardiovascular events considered separately. The association between a high estimated sodium excretion and the composite outcome was strongest among participants with hypertension (P=0.02 for interaction). As compared with the reference range, an estimated sodium excretion that was below 3.00 g per day was also associated with an increased risk of the composite outcome (odds ratio, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.12 to 1.44). As compared with an estimated potassium excretion that was less than 1.50 g per day, higher potassium excretion was associated with a reduced risk of the composite outcome. CONCLUSIONS In this study in which sodium intake was estimated on the basis of measured urinary excretion, an estimated sodium intake between 3 g per day and 6 g per day was associated with a lower risk of death and cardiovascular events, as compared with either a higher or lower estimated level of intake. As compared with an estimate potassium excretion that was less than 1.50 g per day, higher potassium excretion was associated with a lower risk of death and cardiovascular events. (Funded by the Population Health Research Institute and others.)
Description: 12 p
Source: https://fhs.mcmaster.ca/main/documents/urinary_sodium_and_potassium_excretion_mortality_and_cardiovascular_events.pdf
URI: http://repositorio.udes.edu.co/handle/001/3544
ISSN: 1533-4406
0028-4793
Appears in Collections:DCADA. Artículos de Investigación

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